About

Building on the success of previous years, the eighth Florence Nightingale Foundation Annual Conference will take place on 7 June 2018 at the Novotel London West, London.

The Conference is aimed at all nurses, midwives and healthcare professionals, across all aspects of healthcare delivery, seeking to enhance their Continuing Professional Development.  The one-day Influencing Policy and Practice Conference will provide delegates with the opportunity to hear from experienced speakers on a range of topics, participate in a range of high quality masterclasses and network with other senior nurses and midwives.

There will also be an opportunity to hear from the Chief Executive of the Florence Nightingale Foundation about the work that the Foundation is undertaking and how it is committed to supporting nurses and midwives in their personal and career development in an increasingly challenging environment.  We know from the evidence to date that many of our scholars, having participated in our leadership and research scholarships, are reporting the very significant impact on both their professional and personal lives and ultimately on the patient and care environment in a positive way.

The conference has been accredited by the RCN and RCM.

RCM Accredited image
RCN Accredited image

Mobile App

Have you downloaded the FNF Conference App 2018? Get the most out of the event by downloading the App to your smart phone or device. You will be sent the relevant event code and login details upon registering for the event. The App is available for both Apple and Android, just search 'FNF Conference App 2018' or click on the appropriate link below:

Agenda

    Agenda timings and content are subject to change.

  • Registration & coffee

  • Opening address

  • Improvement Policies into Practice

    • Ruth May, Executive Director of Nursing, NHS Improvement
  • Developing the Nursing Workforce in Wales

  • Transforming Maternity Services

  • Safe Staffing

    Q&A session

    Session chaired by Steve Ford, News Editor, Nursing Times

    • Gill Walton, Chief Executive, Royal College of Midwives
    • Dr Jane Ball, Principal Research Fellow, University of Southampton
    • Professor Jean White CBE, Chief Nursing Officer & Nurse Director NHS Wales, Welsh Government
    • Dr Siobhan O'Halloran, Chief Nursing Officer, Republic of Ireland
    • Dr Bob Brown , Executive Director of Nursing / Director of Primary Care & Older People’s Services , Western Health and Social Care Trust
    • Dr Kathryn Jones, Dean of Healthcare Education, Health Education England
    • Ms Susan Stewart, Senior Nurse/Programme Manager Nursing & Midwifery Workload Workforce Planning Programme, Scottish Government
  • Coffee break

  • Masterclasses

    These sessions will be repeated after lunch

    • Finding the Research Hooks: Building Research Capacity across the Nursing Workforce

      This workshop will help you to think about how to embed a research-active culture in your organisation. It is about how you can identify core activities needed to encourage nurses and midwives to engage in R&D activities and promote evidence based practice. We will explore opportunities to use research as an argument for nurse retention, to develop the workforce and promote nursing activity. We will outline some quick wins and hooks that can enhance morale and show integration of research in practice.

      Setting the scene with what the workshop will cover.

      Brief overviews of the experiences of Natalie translating learning from a highly developed organisation culture to a new clinical area and from Vivien’s experiences of needing to focus on areas where we can make a difference.

      Within the workshop participants will be encouraged to discuss their experiences in relation to a selection of the following:

      • Practical issues/considerations:
      • Running journal clubs
      • Working with nurses from the kernel of an idea into a fully fledged proposal – and thinking about the practicalities of research and scalability
      • EBP culture: how to do research in a firefighting culture 
      • Beating apathy
      • Finding funding
      • Building research infrastructure (fellowships)/capacity
      • Ethical approval (HRA approval Vs Service evaluation Vs QI)
      • Governance processes to consider
      • Working at a strategic level

      By the end of the workshop we aim to produce 5 Top Tips to launch and sustain research and evidence in an acute environment from amongst the group. 

       

    • Communicating to Influence Policy

      This interactive session will cover:

      • What is policy and why should I care?
      • Who are my stakeholders?
      • How do I tailor my communications to stakeholders?
      • Group exercise on communicating to influence policy

      • Lauren Milden, Public Health Policy Coordinator, Cambridge Institute of Public Health
    • The five year forward view: transforming a regional service using perinatal mental health as an exemplar

      The workshop aims to increase understanding of required leadership, engagement and processes to successfully assess current state and transform a region-wide service that improves efficiency, reduces variation and improves outcome. The session will focus on encountered challenges and opportunities. It will use the experience of transforming Birmingham and Solihull Perinatal Mental Health Services as the exemplar. Although the topic is focused on Perinatal Mental Health, the workshop will be of interest to those interested and/or involved in healthcare transformation.  Workshop attendees will also learn about new, practical and easy to use technique to achieve group consensus.

    • Using Data to Improve Health Outcomes

      Using data to drive and improve patient outcomes:

      • Identification and utilisation of health data
      • Real world examples of data driven improvements
      • Tools and techniques

    • Effective Patient Discharge in Emergency Care: One Less Readmission

      This Master Class will focus on describing what the elements of an effective acute discharge process look like. It will provide an evidence based, yet pragmatic perspective, through narratives provided by staff, patient and caregivers who participated in a PhD study, funded through the National Institute for Healthcare Research. 

      Key topics addressed will be:

      ·         The changing landscape in emergency care.

      ·         Contemporary practice and the language used by staff.

      ·         What the patients and caregivers really want.

      ·         Communication, information sharing and decision-making

      ·         Tools we could use, but often don't.

      ·         Criteria Led Discharge

      ·         New discharge principles for acute care

      Why does effective patient discharge matter?

      Three principal factors dominate the literature in emergency care settings: readmissions, unplanned admissions and the 4-hour treatment target in ED.

      In England, patient readmissions to hospital are currently between 9 and 16% (NHS England, 2017a), although in some areas of emergency care they have been reported to be as high as 58% (Woodward et al, 2009). Between 2006 and 2015 there was a steadily upward trend of unplanned patient admissions to hospital (Blunt et al, 2015), representing a 23.5% increase over 9 years (NHS England, 2017). Worryingly, this trend has continued; during the period of just one year (2016 to 2017), a rise of 3.3% was seen (NHS England, 2017a, p7). Since 2004, a performance target of 95%, for patients to be seen within 4 hours in emergency departments (ED) (Department of Health (DH), 2004) has been introduced in England.  This was aimed principally at improving patient flow through ED; its primary success however is reliant upon adequate hospital bed capacity and timely patient discharge from hospital (DH 2004a). 

      In 2010, a systematic review by Coulton and Coulton, suggested in general, readmissions to acute care were attributed to poor coordination of discharge. In a report by the National Audit Office (2016) patients and their relatives confirmed this, describing ‘dreadful’ coordination and communication difficulties, particularly in the emergency care discharge process.  The discharge process, which should enable the planning of patient discharge from hospital, has remained a pivotal issue; when this has not been effectively achieved it has resulted in news headlines regarding ‘no available beds’ to admit patients who present to hospital as an emergency (Campbell and Marsh, 2018).

    • Exploring How Nurse Consultants Can Positively Influence the Experience of Acute Care for Older People Living with Frailty

      A clinical academic is a nurse, midwife or allied health professional who engages concurrently in clinical practice and research and provides clinical and research leadership in the pursuit of innovation and delivery of excellent evidence-based healthcare. At Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT) Nurse Consultants have ring fenced time for research with the expectation and support to develop a clinical academic career. The Nurse Consultant workforce is considered key to the delivery of the NMAHP Research Strategy and generation of an active research culture within Hospital sites. In this workshop we will present reflections from 2 nurse consultants who are working in clinical academic roles in frailty at Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

      Dr Helen Hurst and Lisa Cottrell are Nurse Consultants for Older People and Frailty and working in different parts of the frailty pathway (one at the “front door” of the Trust and the other at the “back door”).

      Helen holds a joint clinical and academic position within the Trust and Manchester University. Her presentation will describe her clinical role and her experience of balancing this with a post-doctoral programme of research.

      Lisa is undertaking a part – time PHD at Manchester University supported by MFT PhD Fellowship investigating the relationship between pain and frailty. Lisa will present her experience of combining patient facing service delivery with PhD studies.

      • Professor Michelle Briggs, FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice, University of Manchester
      • Dr Helen Hurst, Consultant Nurse for Older People and Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust
      • Lisa Cottrell, Nurse Consultant for Older People & Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust
  • Lunch and Poster session

     

  • Poster Prize Winner Announcement

     

  • Nursing Now

  • Masterclasses

    • Finding the Research Hooks: Building Research Capacity across the Nursing Workforce

      This workshop will help you to think about how to embed a research-active culture in your organisation. It is about how you can identify core activities needed to encourage nurses and midwives to engage in R&D activities and promote evidence based practice. We will explore opportunities to use research as an argument for nurse retention, to develop the workforce and promote nursing activity. We will outline some quick wins and hooks that can enhance morale and show integration of research in practice.

      Setting the scene with what the workshop will cover.

      Brief overviews of the experiences of Natalie translating learning from a highly developed organisation culture to a new clinical area and from Vivien’s experiences of needing to focus on areas where we can make a difference.

      Within the workshop participants will be encouraged to discuss their experiences in relation to a selection of the following:

      • Practical issues/considerations:
      • Running journal clubs
      • Working with nurses from the kernel of an idea into a fully fledged proposal – and thinking about the practicalities of research and scalability
      • EBP culture: how to do research in a firefighting culture 
      • Beating apathy
      • Finding funding
      • Building research infrastructure (fellowships)/capacity
      • Ethical approval (HRA approval Vs Service evaluation Vs QI)
      • Governance processes to consider
      • Working at a strategic level

      By the end of the workshop we aim to produce 5 Top Tips to launch and sustain research and evidence in an acute environment from amongst the group. 

    • Communicating to Influence Policy

      This interactive session will cover:

      • What is policy and why should I care?
      • Who are my stakeholders?
      • How do I tailor my communications to stakeholders?
      • Group exercise on communicating to influence policy

      • Lauren Milden, Public Health Policy Coordinator, Cambridge Institute of Public Health
    • The five year forward view: transforming a regional service using perinatal mental health as an exemplar

      The workshop aims to increase understanding of required leadership, engagement and processes to successfully assess current state and transform a region-wide service that improves efficiency, reduces variation and improves outcome. The session will focus on encountered challenges and opportunities. It will use the experience of transforming Birmingham and Solihull Perinatal Mental Health Services as the exemplar. Although the topic is focused on Perinatal Mental Health, the workshop will be of interest to those interested and/or involved in healthcare transformation.  Workshop attendees will also learn about new, practical and easy to use technique to achieve group consensus.

    • Using Data to Improve Health Outcomes

      Using data to drive and improve patient outcomes:

      • Identification and utilisation of health data
      • Real world examples of data driven improvements
      • Tools and techniques

    • Effective Patient Discharge in Emergency Care: One Less Readmission

      This Master Class will focus on describing what the elements of an effective acute discharge process look like. It will provide an evidence based, yet pragmatic perspective, through narratives provided by staff, patient and caregivers who participated in a PhD study, funded through the National Institute for Healthcare Research. 

      Key topics addressed will be:

      ·         The changing landscape in emergency care.

      ·         Contemporary practice and the language used by staff.

      ·         What the patients and caregivers really want.

      ·         Communication, information sharing and decision-making

      ·         Tools we could use, but often don't.

      ·         Criteria Led Discharge

      ·         New discharge principles for acute care

      Why does effective patient discharge matter?

      Three principal factors dominate the literature in emergency care settings: readmissions, unplanned admissions and the 4-hour treatment target in ED.

      In England, patient readmissions to hospital are currently between 9 and 16% (NHS England, 2017a), although in some areas of emergency care they have been reported to be as high as 58% (Woodward et al, 2009). Between 2006 and 2015 there was a steadily upward trend of unplanned patient admissions to hospital (Blunt et al, 2015), representing a 23.5% increase over 9 years (NHS England, 2017). Worryingly, this trend has continued; during the period of just one year (2016 to 2017), a rise of 3.3% was seen (NHS England, 2017a, p7). Since 2004, a performance target of 95%, for patients to be seen within 4 hours in emergency departments (ED) (Department of Health (DH), 2004) has been introduced in England.  This was aimed principally at improving patient flow through ED; its primary success however is reliant upon adequate hospital bed capacity and timely patient discharge from hospital (DH 2004a). 

      In 2010, a systematic review by Coulton and Coulton, suggested in general, readmissions to acute care were attributed to poor coordination of discharge. In a report by the National Audit Office (2016) patients and their relatives confirmed this, describing ‘dreadful’ coordination and communication difficulties, particularly in the emergency care discharge process.  The discharge process, which should enable the planning of patient discharge from hospital, has remained a pivotal issue; when this has not been effectively achieved it has resulted in news headlines regarding ‘no available beds’ to admit patients who present to hospital as an emergency (Campbell and Marsh, 2018).

    • Exploring How Nurse Consultants Can Positively Influence the Experience of Acute Care for Older People Living with Frailty

      A clinical academic is a nurse, midwife or allied health professional who engages concurrently in clinical practice and research and provides clinical and research leadership in the pursuit of innovation and delivery of excellent evidence-based healthcare. At Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT) Nurse Consultants have ring fenced time for research with the expectation and support to develop a clinical academic career. The Nurse Consultant workforce is considered key to the delivery of the NMAHP Research Strategy and generation of an active research culture within Hospital sites. In this workshop we will present reflections from 2 nurse consultants who are working in clinical academic roles in frailty at Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

      Dr Helen Hurst and Lisa Cottrell are Nurse Consultants for Older People and Frailty and working in different parts of the frailty pathway (one at the “front door” of the Trust and the other at the “back door”).

      Helen holds a joint clinical and academic position within the Trust and Manchester University. Her presentation will describe her clinical role and her experience of balancing this with a post-doctoral programme of research.

      Lisa is undertaking a part – time PHD at Manchester University supported by MFT PhD Fellowship investigating the relationship between pain and frailty. Lisa will present her experience of combining patient facing service delivery with PhD studies.

      • Professor Michelle Briggs, FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice, University of Manchester
      • Dr Helen Hurst, Consultant Nurse for Older People and Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust
      • Lisa Cottrell, Nurse Consultant for Older People & Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust
  • Coffee break

  • Diversity

     

  • Closing remarks

    • Ursula Ward, Chief Executive, Florence Nightingale Foundation

Speakers

Ursula Ward photo

Ursula Ward

Chief Executive, Florence Nightingale Foundation

Ursula qualified as a registered general nurse in London in...
Read More

Jane Ball photo

Dr Jane Ball

Principal Research Fellow, University of Southampton

Jane started her nursing career at the University of Surrey....
Read More

Ruth May photo

Ruth May

Executive Director of Nursing, NHS Improvement

Ruth May was appointed as Executive Director of Nursing at N...
Read More

Liz Lees-Deutsch photo

Liz Lees-Deutsch

Nurse Consultant , Heart of England

Liz registered as a Nurse in the Black Country at Russell’s...
Read More

Catherine Hannaway photo

Dr Catherine Hannaway

Global Campaign Acting Executive Director, Nursing Now

Catherine has a wealth of experience in designing and delive...
Read More

Siobhan O'Halloran photo

Dr Siobhan O'Halloran

Chief Nursing Officer, Republic of Ireland

Dr. Siobhan O’Halloran, PhD, MSc, FFNMRCSI, BNS, RGN,...
Read More

Helen Hurst photo

Dr Helen Hurst

Consultant Nurse for Older People and Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust

Helen Hurst has worked in the NHS for over 25 years. From 20...
Read More

Lisa Cottrell photo

Lisa Cottrell

Nurse Consultant for Older People & Frailty, Manchester University Foundation Trust

Lisa Cottrell qualified as a nurse over 23 years ago. During...
Read More

Natalie Pattison photo

Professor Natalie Pattison

FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice

Natalie Pattison is a clinical academic who has worked clini...
Read More

Steve Ford photo

Steve Ford

News Editor, Nursing Times

Steve Ford is a journalist who has spent his career special...
Read More

Bob Brown   photo

Dr Bob Brown

Executive Director of Nursing / Director of Primary Care & Older People’s Services , Western Health and Social Care Trust

Dr Bob Brown has been Executive Director of Nursing / Prima...
Read More

Kathryn  Jones photo

Dr Kathryn Jones

Dean of Healthcare Education, Health Education England

Kathryn works as Dean of Healthcare Education for Health Edu...
Read More

Kathryn  Salt photo

Kathryn Salt

Principal Data Manager, NHS Digital

Kathryn joined NHS Digital 12 years ago and is currently a...
Read More

Fiona Nolan photo

Professor Fiona Nolan

FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice

Fiona is a Florence Nightingale Foundation Clinical Profess...
Read More

Ann Lloyd Keen photo

Professor Ann Lloyd Keen

Senior Scholar, London South Bank University & New York University

Professor Health Innovation Policy and Practice. University...
Read More

Bryan Sanderson CBE photo

Bryan Sanderson CBE

Chairman, Florence Nightingale Foundation

Managing Director, BP (1992-2000), Chairman, Standard Charte...
Read More

Gill Walton photo

Gill Walton

Chief Executive, Royal College of Midwives

Gill is a passionate midwife and an experienced midwifery le...
Read More

Jean White CBE photo

Professor Jean White CBE

Chief Nursing Officer & Nurse Director NHS Wales, Welsh Government

Jean White was appointed as Chief Nursing Officer for Wales...
Read More

Vivien Coates photo

Professor Vivien Coates

FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice

Florence Nightingale Foundation Clinical Professor of Nursin...
Read More

Lauren Milden photo

Lauren Milden

Public Health Policy Coordinator, Cambridge Institute of Public Health

Lauren Milden is the Public Health Policy Coordinator at the...
Read More

Debbie Carrick Sen photo

Professor Debbie Carrick Sen

FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice

Debbie is a Florence Nightingale Foundation Chair in Clinic...
Read More

Michelle Briggs photo

Professor Michelle Briggs

FNF Clinical Professor of Nursing Practice, University of Manchester

Professor Michelle Briggs was appointed to the Florence Nigh...
Read More

Neslyn Watson-Druee CBE photo

Dr Neslyn Watson-Druee CBE

Florence Nightingale Foundation

Dr Neslyn Watson-Druee, CBE International Professional Speak...
Read More

Florence Nightingale Foundation Conference 2018 Call for Poster Abstracts: Influencing Policy and Practice

We are particularly keen to receive abstracts that demonstrate an impact on practice, patient care, health and/or policy. The poster may demonstrate the results of a research study, audit, case study, improvement project or a survey. The best poster will be announced at the conference and the author will be awarded a prize. Poster abstracts will be approved for presentation on the basis of quality and originality.

Poster abstract submissions are now closed.

Sponsors

Headline Sponsor

NHS Professionals logo

NHS Professionals

NHS Professionals (NHSP) is the market leader in managed flexible worker services. Working in partnership with over 55 NHS Trusts, we have proven expertise in building staff banks.
Read More

Workshop Sponsor

NHS Improvement logo

NHS Improvement

NHS Improvement is responsible for overseeing foundation trusts and NHS trusts, as well as independent providers that provide NHS-funded care.
Read More

Conference App Sponsor

University of Hertfordshire logo

The School of Health and Social Work is one of the country's largest providers of health and social work education.
Read More

Media Partner

Nursing Times logo

Nursing Times

Founded in 1905, Nursing Times has long been established as the voice of the nursing community.
Read More

Sponsors

UNSION logo

UNISON

It takes a whole team of staff to care for patients and UNISON is proud to be the trade union that represents NHS staff across all healthcare settings.
Read More

logo

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN)

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) is the largest professional association for nursing in the UK.
Read More

Ryalto logo

Ryalto

Ryalto is a mobile app co-developed with NHS organisations and healthcare professionals. Collectively we have the mission to re-ignite the passion...
Read More

Venue

Novotel London West
1 Shortlands
London
W6 8DR

Tel: 020 8741 1555
Website: www.novotellondonwest.co.uk

Location

With 3 of London's main tube lines within a 3 minute walk of the hotel, as well as innumerate bus lines, Novotel London West is an ideal base to reach corporate offices or the Capital's main shopping areas. Located just off the A4 and outside the Central London Congestion ZoneLocated just off the A4 and outside the Central London Congestion Zone, the hotel is just a 20 minute drive from London Heathrow.

Parking

Novotel London West offers over 240 on-site car parking spaces (charged at £1.50 per hour for hotel residents) and 5 coach bays, all of which are secure and under cover. For enquiries please call +44(0)208 2377 540.

Accommodation

Novotel London West, Hammersmith (Conference venue)

One Shortlands, Hammersmith, London, W6 8DR
Tel: 0208 741 1555
Email: h0737-re@accor.com
Web: www.novotellondonwest.co.uk

The hotel is offering a limited number of single occupancy rooms on Wednesday 6 June at the rate of £225.00 inclusive of VAT and breakfast.

To book, please call or email the hotel and quote "Glasgows Conference" to access these rates.  Bookings must be made by 22nd April - after which this offer will be void. 


Best Western Plus, Seraphine Hammersmith Hotel

84 King Street, Hammersmith, London, W6 0QW
Tel: 020 8600 0555
Email: sales@seraphinehotel.co.uk
Web: www.seraphinehammersmith.co.uk

The Best Western Plus Seraphine Hammersmith Hotel is located on King Street just a few minutes’ walk from the Hammersmith Tube and bus stations. The hotel is approximately a ten minute transfer by public transport to the Novotel London West.

The hotel are offering a limited number of rooms on Wednesday 6th June 2018 at the rate of £119 inclusive of room, breakfast, Wi-Fi, bottle of water and VAT.

To book, please call or email the hotel and quote "GLOS" to access these rates.  Bookings must be made by 25th April - after which this offer will be void. Payment is by credit card, 14 days prior to the date of arrival. Cancellation notice 14 days before the date of arrival.


Ibis London Shepherd's Bush

3-5 Rockley Road, London, W14 0DJ
Tel: 020 7348 2020
Web: www.accorhotels.com

Subject to availability, rooms are available on Wednesday 6th June 2018 at a rate of £151.00 (Room only) including VAT.

To book, please call the hotel directly or visit the website, using the contact details above. 


Holiday Inn Express Hammersmith

120-124 King Street, London, W6 0QU
Tel: 0871 902 1621
Email: info@expresshammersmith.co.uk
Web: https://www.expresshammersmith.co.uk/

A modern London hotel offering free WIFI and an inclusive breakfast buffet and six minutes’ walk from Hammersmith underground station.

Subject to availability, rooms are available on Wednesday 6th June 2018 starting at a rate of £162.96, including breakfast and VAT.

To book, please call or email the hotel directly using the contact details above.

Register

Registration is now closed. For any further queries please contact florencenightingale@glasgows.co.uk

Contact